Monday, November 24, 2014

the blossom cowl..a pattern

Here it is! It's the Blossom Cowl pattern requested by so many of you.  Even though we're heading into much warmer months down here in Aus,  you might make it a little summertime project, all ready to wear in plenty of time for Autumn. For all those who are rugging up in your winter woolies right now, the timing is perfect to start something new!

I think this is one of the prettiest crochet stitches of all, and although its finished products look quite complex and detailed, it's actually very straightforward.  Like most of my work, it's simply one stitch repeat, repeat, repeat!   

To begin, you will need:
  • 200gm in your choice of 8ply yarn
  • 5.00mm crochet hook *
  • tapestry needle
  • scissors
The stitch we are using here is the shell stitch, and a single shell is made up of:
  • double crochet (dc)
  • treble crochet (tr)
  • single crochet (sc)
When working a shell stitch we work in increments of 6 (one shell for every 6 chains).

Let's go!

Chain (ch) 120, plus 2

First Row..
be sure to push your hook through both top stitches of the chains in your foundation chain, this will ensure you have the scalloped edge at the bottom of your cowl (see third pic).

1 double crochet (dc) into the second last ch, skip 2 ch, 5 treble (tr) into the third ch, skip 2 ch, 1 dc into the third = one shell.
Continue all the way to the end of your foundation chain, then ch 1 (turning ch) and turn your work

Second Row..
3 tr ** into the first dc (we only work 3 tr at the ends, the rest of the row work 5 tr per shell), skip 2, 1 dc into the third, skip 2, 5 tr into the third, skip 2, 1 dc into the third and repeat to the end

Continue this until your cowl is at the required length, this usually uses the full 200gm, but be sure to allow enough yarn for stitching up your seam.

To stitch up your seam, fold the cowl in half so that each row is lined up and carefully thread with your tapestry needle. Tie off, weave in the ends and voila!
Of course you might choose to work your cowl into the round and avoid a seam altogether.  Or you might like to leave it open and pop a button or brooch  on to keep it in place.

*the size of your hook can vary depending on your yarn and wether you generally work your tension tight or loose, it can vary from one person to the next.

**I like to treble 3 at the end as it gives the work a neater finish.

So there you have it.  I hope this is easy for you to follow.  We had a practice at The Craft Sessions recently and I've since made some amendments to really break it down.